About The Symposium

Xenopus laevis  tadpole following retrograde labeling of the optic nerve with DiIC18(3), is a fluorescent lipophilic cationic indocarbocyanine dye. Image taken by  Douglas Blackiston ,  Allen Discovery Center at Tufts University .

Xenopus laevis tadpole following retrograde labeling of the optic nerve with DiIC18(3), is a fluorescent lipophilic cationic indocarbocyanine dye. Image taken by Douglas Blackiston, Allen Discovery Center at Tufts University.

 
 

A fundamental question in biology is how cells communicate to fashion and repair complex biological structures and tissues.  It is well established that cells communicate through biochemical cues.  However, compelling evidence suggests that cells and tissues of all types use ion fluxes to communicate electrically as well.  In addition, it is now clear that this method of communication is essential to proper development, regeneration, cancer suppression, and tissue homeostasis.  To celebrate this nascent field of developmental bioelectricity, we will have a one-day Satellite Symposium that will be free for researchers attending the 78th Annual Society for Developmental Biology Meeting in Boston, Massachusetts on July 26-30, 2019.

This Satellite Symposium will occur on July 26th, from 9:00am to 4:00pm, and will have talks covering four topics:

  • Bioelectric controls of development

  • Channelopathies and molecular mechanisms

  • Bioelectricity and Regeneration

  • New tools, techniques, and applications


Registration for this Satellite Symposium is free for those attending the 78th Annual Society for Developmental Biology Meeting. If you are interested in attending this Satellite Symposium only (i.e., if you do not want to or cannot stay for the annual meeting), there will be a nominal charge of $50 – please click here, and you will be directed to the Satellite Symposium-only registration page.


We still have a few spots left for talks from graduate students and post-doctoral fellows! If you are interested in giving a short talk at this Satellite Symposium on the work you are presenting at the poster session of the 78th Annual Society for Developmental Biology Meeting, please contact us at bioelectricity@tufts.edu.

 
Confocal images of sections through  Xenopus  tadpole eye co-immunostained for retinal cell differentiation markers of rod cells (green), muller cells (magenta), amacrine cells (cyan), and nuclei (blue) showing organization of differentiated retinal cell populations. Image taken by  Vaibhav Pai ,  Allen Discovery Center at Tufts University .

Confocal images of sections through Xenopus tadpole eye co-immunostained for retinal cell differentiation markers of rod cells (green), muller cells (magenta), amacrine cells (cyan), and nuclei (blue) showing organization of differentiated retinal cell populations. Image taken by Vaibhav Pai, Allen Discovery Center at Tufts University.