About The Symposium

Xenopus laevis  tadpole following retrograde labeling of the optic nerve with DiIC18(3), is a fluorescent lipophilic cationic indocarbocyanine dye. Image taken by  Douglas Blackiston ,  Allen Discovery Center at Tufts University .

Xenopus laevis tadpole following retrograde labeling of the optic nerve with DiIC18(3), is a fluorescent lipophilic cationic indocarbocyanine dye. Image taken by Douglas Blackiston, Allen Discovery Center at Tufts University.

 
 

A fundamental question in biology is how cells communicate to fashion and repair complex biological structures and tissues.  It is well established that cells communicate through biochemical cues.  However, compelling evidence suggests that cells and tissues of all types use ion fluxes to communicate electrically as well.  In addition, it is now clear that this method of communication is essential to proper development, regeneration, cancer suppression, and tissue homeostasis.  To celebrate this nascent field of developmental bioelectricity, we will have a one-day Satellite Symposium that will be free for researchers attending the 78th Annual Society for Developmental Biology Meeting in Boston, Massachusetts on July 26-30, 2019.

This Satellite Symposium will occur on July 26th, from 9:00am to 4:00pm, and will have talks covering four topics:

Session 1. Bioelectric controls of development

  • 9:00–9:25am: Matthew Harris; Harvard Medical School

    Genetic signatures of bioelectric control of development – zebrafish fin proportion and patterning

  • 9:25–9:50am: Kelly McLaughlin; Tufts University

    Probing endogenous ionic controls of pattern formation during development

  • 9:50–10:10am: Maya Emmons-Bell; University of California, Berkeley

    Electric epithelia: a developmental role for membrane potential

  • 10:10–10:35am: Emily Bates; University of Colorado

    Ion channel contributions to Drosophila wing development 

  • 10:35–11:00am: Cynthia Bradham; Boston University

    A Dorsal-Ventral Voltage Gradient is Required for DV Symmetry Breaking in Sea Urchin Embryos

    COFFEE BREAK – 11:00–11:20am

Session 2. Channelopathies and molecular mechanisms

  • 11:20–11:45am: Laura Borodinsky; University of California, Davis

    Glutamate signaling during neural tube formation

  • 11:45–12:10pm: Xi Huang; University of Toronto

    From fly to mammal: targeting ion channels in brain cancer

  • 12:10pm–12:30pm: Vaibhav Pai; Allen Discovery Center at Tufts University

    Biophysical Basis of Teratogenesis and its Cure: A Computational Roadmap for Developmental Bioelectrics for Repair of Neural Defects In Vivo

  • 12:30–12:50pm: Richard Smith; Boston Children’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School

    Sodium channels in the developing cerebral cortex and disease

    LUNCH BREAK – 12:50–2:00pm

Session 3. Bioelectricity and Regeneration

  • 2:00–2:25pm: Wendy Beane; Western Michigan University

    Weak Magnetic Fields and the Regulation of Stem Cell Activity

  • 2:25–2:50pm: Nestor Oviedo; University of California Merced

    Electric stimulation promotes stem cell reconstitution of tissues damaged by ionizing radiation

  • 2:50–3:15pm: Min Zhao; University of California, Davis

    An early crosstalk on regeneration: bioelectric and redox signaling

Session 4. New tools, techniques, and applications

  • 3:15–3:35pm: Harry McNamara; Harvard University

    Synthetic electrophysiology: illuminating pattern formation in bioelectric tissues

  • 3:35–4:00pm: Michael Levin; Allen Discovery Center at Tufts University

    Bioelectric mechanisms: long-range integration and decision-making from cells to organs


Registration for this Satellite Symposium is free for those attending the 78th Annual Society for Developmental Biology Meeting. If you are interested in attending this Satellite Symposium only (i.e., if you do not want to or cannot stay for the annual meeting), there will be a nominal charge of $50 – please click here, and you will be directed to the Satellite Symposium-only registration page.


 
Confocal images of sections through  Xenopus  tadpole eye co-immunostained for retinal cell differentiation markers of rod cells (green), muller cells (magenta), amacrine cells (cyan), and nuclei (blue) showing organization of differentiated retinal cell populations. Image taken by  Vaibhav Pai ,  Allen Discovery Center at Tufts University .

Confocal images of sections through Xenopus tadpole eye co-immunostained for retinal cell differentiation markers of rod cells (green), muller cells (magenta), amacrine cells (cyan), and nuclei (blue) showing organization of differentiated retinal cell populations. Image taken by Vaibhav Pai, Allen Discovery Center at Tufts University.